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Compassion Should Never Be Controversial

A note from our managing editor for September 2017

Published on: August 29, 2017

Compassion

When I joined the ParentMap team as managing editor, I didn’t expect that our September issue’s theme — our global families — would be controversial. But after President Trump’s promises to “build a wall” and the disturbing and tragic events that took place in Charlottesville in mid-August, inclusivity has begun to feel political.

As a long-time resident of the Puget Sound area, I’ve lived everywhere from Tacoma to Lynnwood, Bellevue to Ballard. No matter where I’ve lived or worked, I’ve been fortunate enough to collaborate with people from all races, ethnicities and walks of life. Many are new immigrants to the United States, and all of them bring bits of their own cultures to the table. In fact, my kids’ former nanny — an immigrant from Romania — joins my family’s Thanksgiving table each year. 

This month’s issue highlights the people who are part of the changing face of the Pacific Northwest. The feature story introduces us to families from New Zealand, Sweden, Australia, Iraq, El Salvador, South Korea and San Francisco. They share, in their own words, their worries and fears of moving to America, and reminds us of how much we have in common. 

In today’s political climate, we’re especially glad to showcase the increasingly diverse families who make up our neighborhoods and communities.

This month, we also delve into what it’s really like to raise a bilingual child — including the part no one talks about. But no matter where you came from or how old your children are, there’s work to be done to foster compassion. We also highlight books to help your family discuss one of the biggest global issues of our time: the refugee crisis.

Of course, there’s plenty happening in your very own neighborhood. For most parents, September is synonymous with one thing: back-to-school. To help, we encourage you to visit here and cut (yes, cut!) out our list of questions to get your kid talking about their school day. While you’re at it, you may want to jot down a few picks from our round-up of fall arts. Plus, former ParentMap executive editor Natalie Singer-Velush weighs in on the age-old question of kids and activities: Should we make them practice or let them be?

As always, our issue closes with our Someone You Should Know section. September highlights the work of Angela Rose Black, who is re-imagining what mindfulness looks like in a world where mindfulness often centers on whiteness and economic prosperity.

In today’s political climate, we’re especially glad to showcase the increasingly diverse families who make up our neighborhoods and communities. As the newest member of the ParentMap family, I’m happy to welcome you to ours.

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