Education Videos | Education | Elementary | Tweens + Teens

Video: Is Your Child Learning Next Generation Science at School?

How to make STEM interesting, relevant and fun for kids

Sponsored by:   Chess4Life - Teaching life skills through chess

Q&A with Jessica Thompson, assistant professor, University of Washington College of Education.

In 20013, Washington state adopted the Next Generation Science Standards, a new approach to science instruction that focuses on doing, rather than simply listening.
Jessica Thompson describes science education in the age of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), focusing on the best way to mentor teachers and support students.
Learn how your kids' science classes will differ from the science class you remember and how new methods of teaching are preparing our kids for the jobs of the future.
Topics covered in the video:
  • What's different about Next Generation Science instruction
  • How teachers are being prepared to teach hands-on science
  • How we can build networks of support so students can be successful in science
  • How to encourage more students, especially girls and minorities, to pursue science careers


About Jessica Thompson

A former high school and middle school science teacher, Jessica Thompson is currently an assistant professor at the University of Washington College of Education. Her scholarship focuses on building K-12 networks that support experienced and novice teachers in innovative  and equitable science instruction.

About Chess4Life

Chess4Life's mission is to teach life skills through chess and, in doing so, positively impact as many children's lives as possible. Using a proven, proprietary instruction method, Chess4Life teaches students to understand chess and think effectively through play, rather than simply memorizing moves. They offer classes, camps, tournaments and more at a variety of levels so that students learn chess, learn life skills and have fun. 

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