Outings + Activities | Family Fun | Food

Touchdown! 12 Places for 12th Families to Cheer on the Seahawks

Pubs, play spaces and other venues that are welcoming to kids, and always tuned to the big game

Photo credit: Michele Coates

While it's fun to have family and friends over to watch the Seahawks, there's something about hanging out in a sea of blue and green that makes screaming at the television that much more thrilling. Cheer together and swap high-fives with strangers after an amazing play. Console each other after an unfortunate interception.

Bonding over a common sports team with a room full of strangers is an experience many fans want to share with their kids. But where to go? Here is a list of pubs, play spaces and other spots that make it easy and enticing to bring along the kids and share that 12th Man legacy with the next generation.

Editor's note: We recommend calling ahead to any venue to confirm that the game you want to watch will be on.

Seattle spots to watch the Seahawks with kids 

Photo credit: April Chan

PlayDate SEA, South Lake Union

Head to this huge play space in downtown Seattle (near REI) to send your little ones on their way to run, climb, and jump on a huge, multi-level play area complete with slippery slides and ball blasters while you sit down at a table and take in the game on any of the large flatscreen TVs overhead. PlayDate SEA's play area has a single point of entry, which makes keeping track of the kids a little easier while you keep one eye on the game. PlayDate SEA offers a large and attractive menu, including healthy options as well as crowd favorites such as pizza and chicken wings. There are free refills on coffee, and beer and wine are also available (ask staff about the selection).

Cost: On weekends, play prices range from $8 to $18 per child, depending on age and day of the week, for unlimited play. 

Touchdown! Staff make a point of turning the volume of Seahawks game up so you don't miss each important play. TVs are also located in each of the facilities' private party rooms. For the duration of the regular NFL season, PlayDate SEA offers free admission after 5 p.m. every Monday night for Monday Night Football.

Find it: 1275 Mercer St., Seattle 98109

Wunderkind | Photo credit: Elisa Murray

Wunderkind Seattle, northeast Seattle

Have a tyke who just loves to build? Let them loose to explore the world of Legos at this two-story cafe/bar/play space near University Village, while you enjoy the game on any of four TVs. Upon entry, the toddler play room on the left features Duplo building blocks as well as train sets for little ones. Upstairs kids will find Legos for more advanced builders as well as motorized toys. There are plenty of tables for parents to take a load off and pretend they're in a pub (it almost feels that way). Wunderkind's cafe carries locally made sanwiches and snacks, including many healthy options for your kids; you can also order in. There is coffee as well as a selection of local beers and wines available.

Note: Wunderkind sometimes bumps games when birthday parties are booked. Be sure to call ahead.

Cost: First child costs $6 to play and $4 for each additional child for unlimited play (there are also memberships). Follow Wunderkind Seattle on Facebook for latest updates. 

Touchdown! Play time is free after 5 p.m. on Mondays for Monday Night Football. There are also Lego classes on Fridays for the ambitious youngsters.

Find it: 3318 N.E. 55th St., Seattle 98105

Central Cinema, Central District

Head to this vintage-cool, dine-in theater in the Central District to watch the big game on the big screen. The cinema opens its doors to Seahawks fans for every regular season game, as well as post-season matches, should they come to fruition. You can order pizza, sandwiches, snacks and more, as well as grown-up beverages such as beer, wine and cocktails right from your seat. There's also organic popcorn with real butter. 

Cost: Admission is free for game viewing, but patrons are encouraged to reserve tickets in advance to avoid a mob. You can do so in person or online (note a 50-cent service fee if you choose the latter). No-show tickets are released to stand-bys.

Touchdown! Dessert and Scrabble are available in the theatre lobby should a distraction be necessary. T. T. Minor Playground, at 1698 E. Union St., is three blocks over, if your kiddos need to stretch their legs.

Find it: 1411 21st Ave., Seattle

Elliott Bay Brewing Company, West Seattle

This local brewpub, which also has locations in Lake City and Burien, is a favorite with local families for its upscale comfort food, housemade beers, and an atmosphere that genuinely welcomes kids. Try the crispy-fresh Luna Weizen fish and chips, grilled Cuban sandwich or Elliott Bay steamers to accompany your your organic beer (Demolition IPA or No Doubt Stout are favorites). The kids' menu is reasonably priced and staff happily hand out coloring menus, complete with soy-based crayons. Plenty of high chairs are available and there are changing tables in both the mens and ladies rooms.

Touchdown! Seahawks, as well as other games of local interest, are always on, but the volume is muted as staff want to maintain the atmosphere of a low-key and pleasant restaurant/bar (don't worry, it is plenty loud enough for your kids' fussing to blend in). The West Seattle pub is conveniently located almost directly across the street from the West Seattle Farmers Market, open all year round on Sundays. Husky Deli (cones!) is also across the street.

Find it: 4720 California Ave. S.W., Seattle; also in Lake City and Burien 

Celebrating at Belltown Pub

Belltown Pub, Seattle

Headed to downtown Seattle? At game time, motor to this Belltown staple. Wherever you sit, including the den area or upstairs, there is a TV conveniently located so you don't miss any of the action. The upscale pub food options include mac gratin, steak frites and chicken and waffles; or order weekend brunch from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. For kids and the non-fans in the group, the den area features a shelf full of board games. The pub also has a changing table in the ladies room.

Touchdown! Kids need outdoor time? It's only a roughly five- to six-block walk to Olympic Sculpture Park, where you can run free and celebrate a win along the Seattle waterfront, or blow off steam over a loss.

Find it: 2322 First Ave., Seattle 98121

Eastside spots to watch the Seahawks with kids

Crossroads Mall, Bellevue

Can't decide on what to eat at game time? Head to Crossroads' decidedly non-corporate food court, which boasts eateries offering cuisine from seemingly every corner of the globe (Indian, Thai, Japanese, pizza and much more). Pull up a chair near Market Stage and catch the game along with other families and mall staff who can't help but stop and gander. Ice cream and frozen yogurt are also easily accessible. QFC and Joanne's Fabrics located in the mall make it easy to get some quick errands done in between commercial breaks or at halftime.

Note: Crossroads typically show games but not always. Call ahead to be sure the game will be on if you're planning to watch.

Touchdown! Little ones easily distracted can go play on an assortment of coin-operated rides that cost only a quarter. On weekends, observe a game of chess (or play yourself) on the giant board by the food court. A KCLS branch makes it convenient to check out a book or two, or duck into WiggleWorks Kids to lets kids around 4 and under get a wear-em-out workout.

Find it: 15600 N.E. Eighth St., Bellevue 98008 

Watching Super Bowl 2015 at Crossroads

The Game Neighborhood Bar and Grill

Does the name clue you in? This 15-year-old "classic American diner" in Kirkland's Juanita neighborhood is the kind of restaurant where staff know regulars – young and old – by name. And with seven large screen TVs and a sizable beer selection, it's also the place to be at game time. The sizabale menu includes all-day breakfast and The Game's nationally recognized Ultimate Nachos. The Game offers a $3.99 kids menu.

Touchdown! Should your little one's interest in football wane, there is also an assortment of board games including Candyland, Chutes and Ladders and Trivial Pursuit. 

Find it: 13510 100th Ave N.E., Kirkland 98034

Photo credit: Tavern Hall

Tavern Hall, Bellevue Square

With 23 flatscreens (!) and four shuffleboard tables, this 9,500-square-foot Bel Square favorite is a sports fan's dream. Like so many establishments in the mall, Tavern Hall is sleek, spacious and reflects the upscale atmosphere of its surroundings. But don't let it deter you from bringing the kids. In addition its offerings of 20 draught beers and beer-centered cocktails, the food selection is upscale but enticing starring burgers, brick-oven-baked pretzels and malt-dough pizza. Weekend brunch is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (Note: The dining room is closed to minors after 9 p.m. as are some of the seats, but more than 60 percent of the seats are all ages.)

Touchdown! Distractions in the mall include the soft-surfaced Kid's Cove on the third floor. Or simply take a walk on the skybridge leading to Lincoln Square and watch the traffic below.

Find it: 505 Bellevue Square, Bellevue, 98004 

Flying Pie Pizzeria in Issaquah

Flying Pie Pizzeria, Issaquah

For Gen-Xers and those who grew up before wireless phones, this downtown Issaquah favorite harkens back to the pizzerias of the '80s, with old-fashioned arcade games and pitchers of root beer (or beer for grown ups) while you wait for your made-to-order pizza. Flying Pie also offers gluten-free crust and vegan cheese options for those with special diets. TVs mounted above ensure you don't miss any Seahawks action. There is also a beer and wine selection.

Touchdown! An assortment of books and toys are on hand to entertain your little ones before the food comes. Issaquah's Veterans Memorial Field and park is just a block away if your little ones want a break.

Find it: 30 Front St., Issaquah 98027

Sunset Alehouse in Issaquah

Sunset Alehouse, Issaquah

Right next door to Flying Pie is this pub, a great choice for families with older kids. Ten large flatscreens line every available wall space, with an additional screen outside in the patio area. The menu features classic American fare like burgers and sandwiches, as well as monthly specials menu with items like cabbage rolls and schnitzel. Weekend brunch is available from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and kids also have their own coloring menus. Children are not allowed in the bar area, and staff are diligent about reminding patrons as well as each other to tone down colorful language.

Touchdown! With Veteran's Memorial Field and park nearby, along with Yum-E Yogurt and a KCLS library branch kitty corner to the restaurant, there are lots of options for kids to take a break and stretch their legs.

Find it: 20 Front St. S., Issaquah 98027

North Sound spots to watch the Seahawks with kids

McMenamins Anderson School Woodshop/Kathleen Nyberg
McMenamins Anderson School Woodshop | Photo credit: Kathleen Nyberg

McMenamins Anderson School, Bothell

If you've been wanting to check out the awesome new school-turned-hotel in downtown Bothell, game day can be your chance. Ground zero for Seahawks-viewing is the Woodshop, a bar designed in the the school's old woodshop space. It boasts flatscreen TVs, shuffleboard, pinball games and pool tables, a pub fare menu with McMenamins brews (try the Woodshop IPA, natural beef burgers and more. (Note: Kids are allowed in all venues, but there are some restrictions, such as not being allowed to sit at the bar.) Read our complete review.

Touchdown: Prior to the game, you might start with a swim in the McMenamins community pool or a movie in the all-ages, upscale movie theater, and definitely take a gander at the art-tastic hotel, where you could even have a beer (or coffee) in the old principal's office. 

Find it: 18603 Bothell Way N.E., Bothell 

O'Donnell's in Everett | Photo credit: Facebook

Shawn O'Donnell's American Grill and Irish Pub, Everett

Pubs in Ireland are gathering places for young and old, and O'Donnell's friendly staff and décor reflect similar values and traditions. O'Donnell's offers many Irish favorites including a vibrantly seasoned corned beef and cabbage, shepherd's pie and homemade soda bread. It also has a separate kids menu if your little one isn't as adventurous. 

Touchdown! There are assorted chess, checkers and dominoes out to share, as well as Scrabble. Even tykes who can't yet read can spend a blissfully long time building up dominos and knocking them down. O'Donnell's also features a Tuesday night family trivia night.

Find it: 122 128th St. S.E., Everett 98208

ALSO: Seattle 

The Seahawks exhibit at EMP Museum | Photo credit: Brady Harvey/EMP Museum.

More Seahawks outings 

Are your 12th kids having a hard time waiting until the next game to break out their gear and show their Seattle pride? Here are a few events and opportunities to hold them until next kick-off.

Tour CenturyLink Field: What's it like at CenturyLink Field when there is no game afoot? Walk on the actual field turf, visit sections of the field that normally are off-limits, and let your little ones imagine what it's like to be a Seahawk, with the cheers of 68,000 fans washing over them. Tours last about 30 minutes and cost $14 for adults and $8 for kids (children under 4 free).

Generation 12 Kids Club: Sign your kids up for this Seahawks experience and receive an exclusive Kids Club Kit that includes a Seahawks helmet beanie, membership card (good for a year), Seahawks shoelaces and a Pro Shop discount card. Members also receive invites to special events and contests where they can meet Seahawks players.

More fun Seahawks links and resources

Meet a real seahawk: The Smithsonian Museum lays it out for you: a seahawk is in essence, an osprey, but cool nonetheless.

See an osprey in Washington: The Seattle Audobon Society shares information about the osprey, including the best times and locations for spotting one in the wild.

Where did the Seahawks logo come from? The Burke Museum shares that the logo derives from a Kwakwaka’wakw (pronounced: KWA-kwuh-kyuh-wakw) eagle mask, which was previously on display at the Burke before returning to its permanent home at the Hudson Museum in Maine. 

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