Outings + Activities | Seattle

5 Awesome Acts to See at Seattle Children's Festival

From breakdancing to Bollywood, a free fest that lets kids explore the world

North City Rockers, Seattle Children's Festival
Drop, pop and roll at Seattle Children's Festival

Want to explore a wide variety of dance, music and theater from around the globe in one swoop this weekend? Head to the free, second-annual Seattle Children's Festival at Seattle Center this Sunday, Oct. 11, from 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Organized by the group that knows a thing or two about fantastic, free festivals, Northwest Folklife, the line-up includes a wide range of performances, workshops, and actvities: breakdancing, Bollywood dance, square dancing, storytelling workshops, shadow puppetry, taiko drumming and much more.

Check out the full line-up and pick whatever suits your interest or timeline. If you can't stay all day, but want to plan what to see between naps, soccer and other Sunday to-dos, here are five highlights to check out. 

There are also two "Discovery Zones," where kids can take hands-on workshops and create cool crafts. 

Nrityalaya: Kids teaching Indian classical dance moves

10:30–11:15 a.m., Loft 3

Kids love to teach and to learn from other kids. At this workshop, young Nrityalaya School of Dance instructors will coach audience members on postures and the various steps of bharatanatyam, an ancient Indian form of dance. 

Northwest Tap Connection

Northwest Tap Connection: Rhythms of the Sole

11:30 a.m.–12:15 p.m., Armory Stage

If you haven't yet seen the sparkling moves of the young Northwest Tap Connection dancers, don't miss this performance. The mission  of the group is to train, inspire and nurture young dancers toward artistic excellence, and to perform works by emerging and master choreographers. Warning: You may have requests for tap-dancing lessons following this show.

North City Rockers, Seattle Children's Festival

North City Rockers: Let’s breakdance!

Noon–12:30 p.m., Fisher Pavilion Stage

Hip-hop is popular with kids of all ages — who can resist responding to the strong beats and catchy lyrics? At this performance/workshop, the multi-generational "B-Boying Hip Hop Production Crew"  will perform some of their award-winning moves and coach wanna-be b-boys and girls from the audience. 

Rene Bibaud

4. Rene Bibaud: Interactive jump roping

3:45–4:15 p.m., Armory Stage

Ready for jump-roping tips from a five-time world jump-roping champion and former artist and coach of Cirque Du Soleil? Don't be intimidated. Rene Bibaud has plenty of experience teaching beginners, having taught after-school camps and classes in jump roping. You'll leave with a better understanding of why jump roping is such a phenomenal tool for fitness and artistic expression. Her Ropeworks Youth Performance Troupe comprises kids across the Seattle area who participate in her after-school programs.

5. Canote Brothers

4:15–5 p.m., Fisher Pavilion Stage

The Canote Brothers, twin brothers who have been on the Seattle-area folk circuit for decades, are another don't-miss act. Greg plays fiddle, as relaxed as if he were sitting on the back porch chatting. Jere plays  stringed instruments from guitar to uke with a silver-fingered, twangy touch. Together they perform catchy, long-forgotten folk tunes, soaring scat solos and novelty songs that will get kids (and adults) moving and laughing. (Pssst, also check out the Tallboys' square dance at 2:45 p.m.)

Canote Brothers

If you go...

Where: Seattle Children’s Festival, Fisher Pavilion and the Armory at Seattle Center

When: Sunday, Oct. 11, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

Cost: Free; donations requested

Tips:  Get a passport at the door; kids can check it off as they move through activities and the Discovery Zones. If you need a meal before or after, head to the Armory for family-friendly favorites such as Eltana bagels, MOD Pizza and Plum Bistro. After the festival, if the weather holds, don't forget to check out the new Artists at Play plaground, on the Seattle Center grounds near the EMP Museum. 

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