Tri me. The Burke Museum’s immensely popular Dinosaur Day focuses on triceratops this year, so you (well, OK, your kids) can get answers to all of your most urgent questions: What did it eat? What’s up with those horns? And is that a real fossil? Lots of paleo-themed fun here for your little boneheads, including drawing, fossil viewing, and rock opening with staff from the Stonerose Interpretive Center. Saturday, March 7, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free with admission: $6–$9.50, ages 4 and younger free. Located on the University of Washington campus at the corner of 17th Avenue Northeast and Northeast 45th Street, Seattle.

Easy being green. Seattle’s Green Festival is back for a second year with tons of good green stuff: talks; music; info about careers, eco-tourism, eco-fashion and natural pet care; a home pavilion; and a Green Kids Zone. Ride your bike and park it in the Bike Valet, and you’ll get $5 off the regular $15 two-day admission fee (ages 18 and younger free). Saturday, March 28, noon–6 p.m. and Sunday, March 29, noon–5 p.m. Washington State Convention & Trade Center, 800 Convention Place, Seattle.Redd Legg dancers

Green and Redd. Redd Legg Dance’s performance of “It’s Good to Be Green” is a twofer: Kids are introduced to accessible modern dance and ideas about habitat protection, pollution and global warming. Saturday and Sunday, March 7 and 8, 1 p.m. $10, ages 14 and younger $8. Buy tickets at Brown Paper Tickets. Broadway Performance Hall, 1625 Broadway, Seattle.

—Kris Collingridge

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