Social and Emotional Learning, Part 2

Watch part 1 in the series.

Cute kids in a classroomJoan Duffell, Executive Director, Committee for Children
A growing number of educators and experts are recognizing that children who receive an education focused solely on academic performance may be ill-equipped for meeting life challenges, that the development of softer skills — emotional competencies like awareness of self and others, emotional self-regulation, self-motivation, empathy, and other relationship management skills — are the best predictors of both academic and life success. The field of social and emotional learning (SEL) has emerged from this new embrace and understanding of how emotions and intelligence contribute to success and happiness.

Joan Duffell, Executive Director of the Committee for Children and co-chair of the national Social-Emotional Learning Program Provider Council, sat down with ParentMap to provide insight into the benefits of social-emotional learning — and what schools and parents can do to foster these crucial social skills in children.

Topics covered in the video series include:

  • Reasons for the growing necessity of and emphasis on social and emotional learning
  • How social-emotional learning enhances academics, creativity and innovation
  • How schools are working to incorporate social and emotional learning programs to support our kids
  • Ways parents can foster development of social-emotional skills in their kids
  • How social skills impact how children succeed in life
  • How a focus on social-emotional skills building helps prevent and address bullying
Joan Duffell

About Joan Duffell
Joan Duffell is Executive Director of Committee for Children, an international nonprofit organization dedicated to the safety, well-being and social development of children through the provision and support of research-based educational programs for educators, families and communities. She co-chairs the national Social-Emotional Learning Program Provider Council, which is convened by CASEL, the national Collaborative for Social, Emotional and Academic Learning.




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